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Mysteries of the Great Lakes Marketing Guide


 

Photos


The giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes features spectacular aerial photography of the Great Lakes, and this shot of Lake Superior’s Battle Island in Lake Superior is one of those inspiring vistas.


Aerial photography gives scale to the vastness of the Great Lakes in the giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes.  The Great Lakes are so large that they can be seen from space – unlike other famous geographical landmarks including Mount Everest and the Grand Canyon.


Mist just off the shores of Slate Islands Provincial Park, Lake Superior, gives this unique place an ethereal glow in the giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes.


Woodland caribou on Lake Superior’s Slate Islands have developed some unusual adaptations. These adaptations are one of the mysteries in the giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes.


Director/Producer David Lickley (left) with Second Unit Director of Photography Per-Inge Shei and 1st Camera Assistant Filipe Teixeira pause for a photo during the filming of woodland caribou on Lake Superior’s Slate Islands for the giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes.


The Mysteries of the Great Lakes crew prepare to film lake sturgeon underwater in Shawano, Wisconsin. The lake sturgeon is an at-risk species that predates dinosaurs.


A crowd of onlookers gathers to watch Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources’ fisheries biologists pull massive lake sturgeon from the Wolf River in order to collect data about the health of this endangered species. Many of Shawano’s citizens have volunteered to help clean up rivers and guard the sturgeon during the critical spawning season. The addition of the Mysteries of the Great Lakes film crew added to the excitement and helped draw nationwide attention to this annual spectacle.


Sturgeon spawning in Wisconsin’s Wolf River. Once plentiful in the Great Lakes, lake sturgeon are an endangered species.  Mysteries of the Great Lakes documents the work that has been undertaken to protect these living fossils.


Ron Bruch (centre) and fellow Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources’ fisheries biologists pull a netted sturgeon to the shore of the Wolf River for study while the IMAX camera cranes above to capture the action up close for the giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes.


The giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes visits the Benjamin Islands. The Islands are a popular destination in the North Channel of Lake Huron’s Georgian Bay. The smooth pink granite rocks, windswept pines, and sparkling waters together create the vistas that Georgian Bay is famous for.


The makers of Mysteries of the Great Lakes had to be creative in order to capture a wide shot of the Agawa pictographs near Wawa, Ontario. Lake Superior’s waters were too rough to shoot the pictographs from a boat. An obliging submerged rock served as a platform for the camera’s tripod allowing the camera to sit just above the water’s surface.


The giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes pays homage to the contribution the voyageurs made to Great Lakes history with a reenactment of a voyageur trek, complete with birch bark canoe, just off the Michipicoten First Nation on Lake Superior.


The Mysteries of the Great Lakes crew set up on Goat Island, in Niagara Falls, New York in order to capture dramatic over-the-edge crane shots of famous Niagara Falls. A crowd of onlookers gathered to watch the proceedings.


Mysteries of the Great Lakes crew members Key Grip, Derek Teakle (foreground), and Director of Photography, Reed Smoot, at work on Goat Island in Niagara Falls, New York capturing dramatic over-the-edge crane shots of famous Niagara Falls.


Second Unit Director of Photography Per-Inge Shei films a power struggle between two woodland caribou on Lake Superior’s Slate Islands for the giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes.


The US Brig Niagara distinguished itself during the Battle of Lake Erie after which it spent 93 years at the bottom of Misery Bay before being restored. It’s now a training ship when not docked at Lake Erie Maritime Museum. The ship sailed again for the giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes.


The giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes visits the Benjamin Islands. The Islands are a popular destination in the North Channel of Lake Huron’s Georgian Bay. The smooth pink granite rocks, windswept pines, and sparkling waters together create the vistas that Georgian Bay is famous for.


Heading off into a dazzling Georgian Bay sunset in the giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes. The Great Lakes are more than picturesque places to visit  - one in every three Canadians and one in every seven Americans rely on the Great Lakes for their fresh water.


Line Producer and Editor, James Lahti (right) works with 1st Camera Assistant, Filipe Teixeira to prepare the camera for an underwater shoot at Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area – Fathom Five in Tobermory, Ontario.  The giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes touches on the Lakes’ shipwreck lore. An estimated 5,000 ships have been lost on the Great Lakes.


Director of Photography, Reed Smoot sets up for a shot of sturgeon fry being released into the Wolf River near Shawano, Wisconsin for the giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes.


With the help of volunteers, lake sturgeon fry are released into the Wolf River by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Biologist Ron Bruch (right) for the giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes.


Many of Shawano, Wisconsin’s citizens have volunteered countless hours to help clean up rivers and guard the sturgeon during the critical spawning season. In this photo, volunteers head upstream while the Mysteries of the Great Lakes production crew looks on from the water.


The combination of sun, sand, and surf at Presque Isle State Park in Erie, Pennsylvania make for an ideal playground in the giant screen film Mysteries of the Great Lakes.



 


 

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