Entrance

A recreated stylized rock entrance welcomes visitors to the world of Diamonds!


formation


Formation

The origin of diamonds is linked to Earth’s early history. Formed billions of years ago deep within the Earth, carbon requires just the right pressure and temperature to form diamond. Visitors will explore the complexities of diamond formation in a computerized model of the Earth by trying to find the depths where diamonds commonly form.


Exploration

Carried from deep within the Earth to the surface by volcanic eruptions, diamonds lay there for thousands of years before being discovered by geologists using the most advanced technology. Finding diamonds can take decades. It takes perseverance, determination, and a bit of luck to find “the mother lode”. Visitors will meet a diamond exploration geologist, learn about the challenges and rewards of diamond exploration, and see the tools used to discover ore bodies.


formation


Mining and Processing

While diamonds were first mined in India over 4,000 years ago, modern mining as we know it began in South Africa in the late 19th century. Today, Canada is emerging as a major diamond producer. Mining in the Canadian Arctic has its share of challenges. Visitors will gain a better appreciation for the complexities of operating a mine in a remote location, and learn the mining processes involved in producing a single, one carat, polished and gem-quality diamond.


Properties

Diamonds are the hardest natural substances known to man. They are non-metallic, do not conduct electricity, have great thermal conductivity, and refractive index. These properties make them useful, not only in jewelery, but in many industrial, technological and scientific applications as well. By using real tools, visitors will discover the properties of diamonds and discover their many uses.



The Gem

Housed in a jewelry store setting, this section will explore how diamonds are cut and polished to liberate their fiery beauty. Colour, clarity, carat, and cut determine the value of a gem-quality diamond. Visitors will manipulate the tools of the trade to evaluate diamonds.